TIM Innovation Guidebook Four Creating Innovation Management Processes

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Innovation Management is an improbable marriage between chaos and structure. Most larger organizations today have structured activities around innovation and product/service development decision-making and activity flows into processes. On the one hand, they have to because, among other things, only a proper framework of decision-making for activities can minimize your risk, avoid re-work, put activities in the right sequence, and relate all the activities to each other. In a way, a restaurant is a nice analogy: it has a chef (a manager), a kitchen team, a team of waiters, and a set of processes (recipes, work procedures). Without a proper sequence of activities in the recipes and work procedures, a list of ingredients, etc. the kitchen team is almost by definition destined to fail consistently at producing a proper meal, and the team of waiters would consistently fail at serving dishes to clients with a minimally acceptable degree of predictable quality. 

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Innovation Management is an improbable marriage between chaos and structure. Most larger organizations today have structured activities around innovation and product/service development decision-making and activity flows into processes. On the one hand, they have to because, among other things, only a proper framework of decision-making for activities can minimize your risk, avoid re-work, put activities in the right sequence, and relate all the activities to each other. In a way, a restaurant is a nice analogy: it has a chef (a manager), a kitchen team, a team of waiters, and a set of processes (recipes, work procedures). Without a proper sequence of activities in the recipes and work procedures, a list of ingredients, etc. the kitchen team is almost by definition destined to fail consistently at producing a proper meal, and the team of waiters would consistently fail at serving dishes to clients with a minimally acceptable degree of predictable quality.